Crab Nebula (M1; NGC 1952)

The nebulous remnant in the constellation Taurus of a supernova that exploded in AD 1054. In coloured photographs it appears as a network of red filaments surrounding an elliptical area of pale white light. This white light is synchrotron radiation generated by hot ionized gas in a magnetic field. The filaments are the outer layers of the star that were blown off in the explosion and are travelling outwards at about 1,500 km/s.
The core of the star that exploded remains at the centre of the nebula. It is now a pulsar. Electrons emitted by the pulsar are responsible for the synchrotron radiation. The interval between flashes from the pulsar is 33 milliseconds; flashes are seen in visible light as well as the radio pulses.

 

 

 Date

2004-01-25

 Location

 Ebenwaldhöhe

 Condition

-15°

 CCD

SBIG ST-237A

 Exposure Time

 LRGB 30:20:20:20 mins

 Optics

 Optolyth APO 100/700mm

Mount & Guiding

G-11 & ST-4.

 

 

 Date

2001-Jan + 2001-Feb

 Location

 Hohe Wand

 Condition

?

 Film

 Kodak Ektapress PJ400

 Exposure Time

 2 * 45 minutes

 Optics

 Meade 10" f/6,3 + GEG (without Lens) + Canon EOS 5000

 effective F.L.

 1750 mm (f/6,9)

Mount & Guiding

G-11 & ST-4.


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© Gerald Hitz 1997-2004